Place

Kennon Cheek/Rebecca Clark Building

The Kennon Cheek/Rebecca Clark building was built in the 1920s to house the university laundry. It was renamed in 1998 to honor Kennon Cheek, a former janitor in Venable Hall and first president of the university janitor's association, and Rebecca Clark, who worked as a housekeeper at the Carolina Inn and in the university laundry before becoming a nurse.

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Citation: “Kennon Cheek/Rebecca Clark Building,” From the Rock Wall, accessed July 7, 2022, https://fromtherockwall.org/places/kennon-cheekrebecca-clark-building.

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