Oral History

Mildred Council - On her family, segregation, restaurant business, and Head Start

Interviewed by Donna M. Clark on November 14, 1994

"“[I don’t think] that there would be anything that I would have done differently. I really don’t."

- Mildred Council

This interview was recorded in 1994 for the Southern Oral History Program. Mildred Council, born in Chatham County in 1929, is the owner of Mama Dip’s Kitchen in Chapel Hill. She reflects on her family’s history in North Carolina and her childhood working on her father’s farm. Then, she talks about ending her marriage after thirty-two years. Lastly, she explains how she came to start Mama Dip’s and tells of her experiences as a leader in the community. Throughout the interview, she emphasizes the importance of having a good work ethic, being self-sufficient, and helping raise others up so that they can take care of themselves.

This interview is part of a project done from 1993-1998, concentrating on the experiences of women leaders and attempting to redefine leadership to encompass women's efforts in grassroots movements, especially in environmental movements, community development, and self-help organizations.

Mildred Council - On her family, segregation, restaurant business, and Head Start

Mildred Council - On her family, segregation, restaurant business, and Head Start

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Oral history interview of Council, Mildred conducted by Clark, Donna M. on November 14, 1994 at Home of Mildred Council, Chapel Hill, NC. Processed by Killen, William.

Citation: Southern Oral History Program, “Mildred Council - On her family, segregation, restaurant business, and Head Start,” From the Rock Wall, accessed April 18, 2024, https://fromtherockwall.org/oral-histories/mildred-council-on-her-family-segregation-restaurant-business-and-head-start.

Rights: Open for research. The Southern Oral History Program (SOHP) welcomes non-commercial use and access that qualifies as fair use to all unrestricted interview materials in the collection. The researcher must cite and give proper credit to the SOHP. The SOHP requests that the researcher informs the SOHP as to how and where they are using the material.

View this interview on the Southern Oral History Program website

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