Black business
Place

Bill's Bar-B-Que



"He had a wood yard; he sold wood. And so he asked and said, “Mary, why don’t you open a restaurant?” Because she could cook too, because she was cooking in the home and was taking care of the two children, you know...so that’s what they done. He did away with the wood yard and then we built this little thing. It was a little bit bigger than this room here. And we just had barbecue and fried chicken. And I started working for them...and I worked there for I think about 20 years."

- Mildred Council



"It had the best chicken sandwiches, and chuck wagon sandwiches and hot dogs in town."

- Willis Farrington

Founded by the Council family, Bill's Bar-B-Que served ribs, chopped pork bar-b-que, chicken, and seafood from its location on North Graham Street. Mildred "Mama Dip" Council worked there after marrying Joe Council in 1947 and later went on to work at several other local restaurants before opening her own in 1976.

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Citation: “Bill's Bar-B-Que,” From the Rock Wall, accessed February 4, 2023, https://fromtherockwall.org/places/bills-bar-b-que.

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