Place

Colonial Drugstore

"...we had Colonial Drugstore, the Rock Quarry, a number of other restaurants around here that we were able to desegregate. And what it caused, students, with the leadership of some adults like Hilliard Caldwell and some others, we began to demonstrate and ask the peoples for service at the lunch counter, stuff like that, and they refused. So we would boycott and picket 'em."

- Fred Battle

Colonial Drug Company opened at 450 W. Franklin Street in 1951, replacing Milton's Clothing Cupboard. On February 28, 1960 the Chapel Hill Nine held a sit-down protest at the segregated lunch counter, touching off the first of many protests of the store's segregationist policies over the next four years. The store did not integrate until the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964.

Colonial Drugstore
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Citation: “Colonial Drugstore,” From the Rock Wall, accessed October 6, 2022, https://fromtherockwall.org/places/colonial-drugstore.

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