Patricia "Pat" Jackson

"All I wanted to do was just be present and serve activism, not understanding that that came with some consequences. . .once you step out in service there are consequences and just as you step out in service for the lord there are consequences."

- Pat Jackson

Patricia "Pat" Jackson

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On St. Joseph CME Church from 1947-1953

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On St. Joseph CME Church from 1947-1953

Find out more

Interviewed by Kathryn Wall on March 23, 2022

Interviewed by Kathryn Wall on March 23, 2022

“All the sermons that you are hearing, preaching, you are seeing God at work through the elders. Not until then, did you realize that was the relationship with the Lord. You had to give an account to God that he set you up and kept you safe and now I need to get your attention. He got my attention. Prior to that, I did not do the actual study.”

- Patricia "Pat" Jackson

Mrs. Pat Jackson talks about her time attending Lincoln High School, focusing on the marching band and the football team. She talks about her mother-in-law, Mrs. Marian Cheek Jackson, as a mother figure and how she valued education and family. Mrs. Pat also discusses Mrs. Jackson as a mother and her childhood, and what was most important in her life. She talks about community and the different roles within her family that shaped her life as she grew up. Mrs. Pat emphasized the importance of football games and how big of a deal it was in the community. She also talks about how church and her involvement in church shaped her faith and her involvement in the community. Lastly, she talks about the B1 Navy Band coming to Chapel Hill and how she was shocked by the treatment of African Americans in Chapel Hill and at UNC.

Find out more

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On school integration and the significance of churches

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On school integration and the significance of churches

Patricia “Pat” Jackson is the daughter-in-law of Mrs. Marian Cheek Jackson, the namesake of the Jackson Center. She brings with her to her interview several clippings from various newspapers, some of which include the first articles her daughter wrote in her journalism career or articles about Chapel Hill’s Black owned business center. These newspaper clippings hold significance in Mrs. Jackson’s personal history as well as the broad history of Chapel Hill. Mrs. Jackson recounts the desegregation of the local high schools; she recalls a sense of pride and determination as one of the first generations of Black students to attend formerly all-white Chapel Hill High School. She also discusses the significance of church in the community, and the Harrison family whose approach to church allowed for the expansion of fellowship. Ms. Jackson herself was raised by the community’s various churches, attending youth programming such as Vacation Bible School, and reflects now upon the importance of youth in the church community in order to keep faith alive.
Find out more

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On her faith and activism

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On her faith and activism

This interview is part of the Marian Cheek Jackson Center’s Life History Series. Pat Jackson was born and raised in Chapel Hill North Carolina. She is a current member of St. Joseph Christian Methodist Episcopal Church in Chapel Hill. She serves as a stewardess and motherly figure within the site and aids the Reverend Troy Harrison in his operations. Jackson grew up attending Nevil’s Chapel with her mother and then as time progressed she gravitated with some of her classmates to First Baptist for her baptism and then ultimately to St. Josephs where she has spent all of her time since. During the Civil Rights Movement, Jackson served as an activist within the Chapel Hill community and participated in many marches and protests with a faithful sense of purpose in mind. She shares the importance of women in their church and in the broader community and how active participation in service to the community encourages members to join the Church family and give back. She ponders why society and historical principles encourage a separation of genders that has transcended into religion and offers cultural backgrounds to be at fault. Jackson strives to promote equality in service to the Lord and she lives out that belief in her daily work.
Find out more

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On her family, faith, community, and civil rights

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On her family, faith, community, and civil rights

Patricia Jackson grew up in Chapel Hill, NC and has been a member of St. Joseph CME Church for over forty years.  She now works with Wake County Schools and is also a church secretary, a stewardess, and a community activist.  This interview was done as part of the Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History’s life histories of local leaders. She recounts memories of grandparents, especially maternal grandmother. She comes from family of caretakers; lineage of family; church experience growing up—she changed from First Baptist to St. Joseph CME. She shares her experiences with visiting UNC’s campus, the Civil Right’s demonstrations in the 60’s and sit-ins at local drugstore. She goes on to speak about how she recalls Carolina Theatre, and Carolina Coffee Shop. She includes a memory omarch ending with fire hoses and reflections on Hargraves and St. Joseph as community centers. Her community mentors were Mr. Hargraves and Howard Lee. The interview includes her experiences of pride at Lincoln High, integration of schools and importance of women figures in her life, especially in family and at church. This flows into how she builds a connection between church and residential “Pottersfield” community. She reflects on social justice at St. Joseph and the importance of Methodist theology and gender roles in church. She shares her journey of becoming a secretary and stewardess and campaigning for Howard Lee during 1968 Mayoral Election. She recounts her experience of raising her first child while finishing school. She begins to conclude the interview with her life in Spokane, Washington in the 70’s; moving back to Chapel Hill; continued influence of “independent, strong-willed” women in her life, especially her sister Gladys Pendergraph and her mother in law, Marian Cheek Jackson. She continues to share her experiences of raising children, memories of her father, the importance of family, physical locations around Chapel Hill in the 1960’s, Hargraves as true community center, and finally, how the mission of St. Joseph CME and connection to her life.  
Find out more

Patricia Jackson - Fire Hose

Patricia Jackson - Fire Hose

In this audio clip, Ms. Pat (speaking with Della Pollock) tells the story of the time she went to Franklin Street and got caught up in a protest at Big John's pharmacy.
Find out more

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On St. Joseph's CME and women in church

Patricia "Pat" Jackson - On St. Joseph's CME and women in church

Ms. Pat Jackson gives an overview of her involvement in the organizations within St.
Joseph’s CME, starting from when she was a child. This is followed by a discussion of the
various power dynamic that occur between women in the church, and how to overcome any
challenges that can arise from these situations. To finish it off, Ms. Pat Jackson gives beautiful
words of encouragement to young women growing up in the church.
Find out more
"We’re writing our own history, thank you!"

Ms. Esphur Foster

Want to add in?  Have a different view?  What do you think? Want to upload your own photos or documents?

History is not the past.  It’s the sense we make of the past now. Click below to RESPOND—and be part of making history today.

Respond