Oral History

Marian Cheek Jackson - On community history, family history. and the University of North Carolina

Interviewed by Rob Stephens and Hudson Vaughan on November 29, 2007

"You have to keep going."

- Marian Cheek Jackson

Mrs. Marian Cheek Jackson begins with a description of prominent Black businesses that used to exist in the African American community, (including Mason's grocery store); St. Joseph's Christian Methodist Episcopal Church's role in civil rights protest; Martin Luther King, Jr.'s visit and the response of the local Ku Klux Klan; church march on 15-501 and fears of protests. Jackson describes her grandparents' ties to Chapel Hill and memories of her grandparents. Jackson also talks about how St. Joseph's emerged from other churches, growing out of Hamlet church. She also recalls the relationship between the University of North Carolina and the Black community. Jackson also discusses the visits of prominent politicians, (President John F. Kennedy and Franklin D. Roosevelt); black labor for prominent University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professors; her husband's employment; St. Paul's Baptist; pending lawsuit with community developers; the impact of revitalization on black businesses and Bishop Hoyt. Jackson closes with a discussion on her work ethic and health and senior programs at the Senior Citizen.

Marian Cheek Jackson - On community history, family history. and the University of North Carolina

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Oral history interview of Jackson, Marian Cheek conducted by Stephens, Rob on November 29, 2007 at Chapel Hill, NC. Processed by Cosby, Isabel.

Citation: Marian Cheek Jackson Center, “Marian Cheek Jackson - On community history, family history. and the University of North Carolina,” From the Rock Wall, accessed April 18, 2024, https://fromtherockwall.org/oral-histories/marian-jackson-8.

Rights: Permission from the interviewee is required before quoting from the interview.

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