Oral History

Paul Caldwell - On Northside, the Civil Rights Movement, and his work in the University Police at UNC

Interviewed by Peter Blumberg and Morgan Beamon and Jacob Lerner

Paul Caldwell was the first African-American sergeant, lieutenant, and captain of University Police at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This interview includes Mr. Caldwell’s early life; The evolution of the Northside Neighborhood; Memories of growing up in Chapel Hill; Mr. Caldwell’s mother; Northside’s role within Chapel Hill; Civil Rights sit-ins; His experiences as a police officer for UNC and the positive relationship he had with students, regardless of race; Most notably, finding the Law School Dean in a compromising position with a younger woman; Mr. Caldwell talks a suicidal student down from jumping; Working at Colonial Store and his experiences with the Civil Rights movement while there; Meeting JFK and Jimmy Carter; Further discussion on the racial transformation of the neighborhood and Mr. Caldwell’s interactions with his student neighbors; Local developer’s attempt to buy the Caldwell’s current home; Mr. Caldwell’s; First Baptist Church; Younger generations lack of appreciation for what they have and what Mr. Caldwell’s generation sacrificed; Mr. Caldwell’s family and the prevalence of police officers within it.

Paul Caldwell - On Northside, the Civil Rights Movement, and his work in the University Police at UNC

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Oral history interview of Paul Caldwell conducted by Peter Blumberg at Paul Caldwell's House. Processed by Joshua Trower.

Citation: Marian Cheek Jackson Center, “Paul Caldwell - On Northside, the Civil Rights Movement, and his work in the University Police at UNC,” From the Rock Wall, accessed August 10, 2022, https://fromtherockwall.org/oral-histories/paul-caldwell-2.

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