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Civil Rights protesters march from St. Joseph C.M.E. to Franklin Street

A protest march makes its way from St. Joseph's CME Church to Franklin Street. To maintain calm, the Chapel Hill police often treated the marches as parades. Eat at Joe's, the restaurant named in the banner carried in the front, was named in many signs protesting segregation. The owner was a vocal supporter of segregation, vowing he would never integrate.

Hilliard Caldwell can be seen on the left carrying the edge of the banner. He is recognizable in many of the Jim Wallace civil rights pictures by his driving cap. Charley Mae (Foster) Norwood is to his right wearing a dark skirt, holding the banner behind the word "FREEDOM". Euyvonne Cotton is behind and to the right of Charley Mae (Foster) Norwood. Eugene Hines is wearing a white polo shirt and sunglasses, holding the banner behind the word "EAT". Jackie Moore is behind Eugene Hines wearing a white shirt. William Carter is next to Eugene Hines in the plaid shirt holding the banner. Ophelia Johnson is behind William Carter, wearing sunglasses. Harold Foster is wearing a white button-up shirt and black tie, to the right of Ophelia Johnson. The policeman on the far left is Coy Durham.

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Civil Rights protesters march from St. Joseph C.M.E. to Franklin Street

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Photograph by Jim Wallace of Caldwell, Hilliard and Foster, Esphur and Hines, Eugene and Carter, William.

Citation: Jim Wallace, “Civil Rights protesters march from St. Joseph C.M.E. to Franklin Street,” From the Rock Wall, accessed November 29, 2021, https://fromtherockwall.org/images/civil-rights-protesters-march-from-st-joseph-cme-to-franklin-street.

Rights: Copyright held by Jim Wallace. Contact From the Rock Wall for more information about permissions.

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